Gary Paulsen, AN 82-YEAR-OLD WRITER, HAS DIED.

 Gary Paulsen, AN 82-YEAR-OLD WRITER, HAS DIED.

Gary Paulsen, AN 82-YEAR-OLD WRITER, HAS DIED.

Gary Paulsen, AN 82-YEAR-OLD WRITER, HAS DIED.

Gary Paulsen is a person who has a lot of facts about him.

On the morning of October 13, 2021, a prominent personality in young adult literature who earned three Newberry Medals and a Margaret Edwards Award, among other honors, died. Publishers Weekly confirmed it in a tweet later that day, although the cause of death is yet unknown.

In my mother’s school library, his books were on constant rotation, with pupils eagerly anticipating their return and picking them up almost as soon as they touched the shelf. His books had some of the most well-loved covers, with any paperbacks appreciating the velvet softness around the edges. I can’t tell you how many Hatchet book report presentations I’ve sat through.

Hatchet was handed to any student who disliked reading or preferred to go outside, and they insisted on reading the sequels: The River (1991), Brian’s Winter (1996), Brian’s Return (1999), and Brian’s Hunt (2000). (2000). (2003).

However, Hatchet and the other novels in the series aren’t Paulsen’s sole works.

 Gary Paulsen, AN 82-YEAR-OLD WRITER, HAS DIED.
Gary Paulsen, AN 82-YEAR-OLD WRITER, HAS DIED.

He was a prolific author who wrote more than 200 books, many of which focused on the outdoors, adventure, and survival. Woodsong and Winterdance, his memoirs about his travels with sled dogs, were the foundation for the 2002 Disney film Snow Dogs, which was based on his true experiences in the wild (he even competed in a sled dog race in 1983!).

They aren’t, however, his only autobiographical works; he also wrote a number of volumes about his life, documenting how he came to understand the environment. He lays out a lot of it in Guts: The True Stories of Hatchet and the Brian Books. Paulsen was born in 1939, and it’s safe to assume he had a difficult childhood. Much of it instilled in him the ability to be self-sufficient at a young age, an experience he later reflected on in his art. However, he suffered in literary classes in primary school, according to his book, Eastern Sun, Western Moon: An Autobiographical Odyssey. However, his subsequent passion for books, as well as his appreciation for them, is all the more profound as a result of this.

Gary Paulsen was well-known for being a staunch Luddite.

He despises most things technological, although he admits that firing televisions is fun. He chose to live in relative poverty in New Mexico with his wife, avoiding cities as much as possible, stating that it was the only way he could think clearly. He claimed to loathe mankind, except for children, for whom he wrote the majority of his works. Give a Gary Paulsen novel to a hesitant young reader, and you’ll have a new reader and a life transformed. Gary Paulsen continued to write for children until the very end; his most recent book, How to Train Your Dad, was published just last month, in September 2021.

Give the title of the book that has had the greatest impact on you. I’m sure you read it when you were younger. In the time I have left, I want to make creative books — for kids — because they are still open to new ideas.

After learning of his death, fans of his writings took to the internet to write their own eulogies, mourning a public figure who was so important to so many people’s childhoods in the only way we know how: communally. Fans described how they grew up reading his books and how they passed them on to their children when the time came; how he inspired others to love the outdoors; and how they learned so much about survival from his stories, lessons they will never forget. There were even a few stories from enthusiasts about how he and his books encouraged them to start racing sled dogs. I believe he would have enjoyed it even if it had arrived via the internet.

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Gary Paulsen’s voice will be severely missed, according to facts. While we mourn and remember a guy who influenced many a reader, I’ll leave you with this statement, a reminder that he respected us as much as we valued him:

Even if books could have, offer, be, and show more, readers would still be required to contribute sound, scent, light, and everything else that books cannot.
The text requires you to do so.

Source : NEWS 24 HOUR

 

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